Extracorporeal ShockWave Therapy as a Pain Management Solution

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Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as a Pain Management Solution

Let’s go to the source of your discomfort: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can effectively cure pathological abnormalities of tendons, ligaments, capsules, muscles, and bones with little side effects and reduced danger when administered by a skilled physiotherapist.

Shockwaves are high-energy sound waves that are audible. Shockwaves have been employed in the healthcare and medical industries since 1980, for example, to target kidney stones and cause fragmentation and disintegration. However, technology has come a long way as a modern pain relief tool in recent years. Trained practitioners can use low-energy shockwaves on painful body parts and regions to speed the healing process across the entire body by boosting the metabolic rate and improving blood circulation, allowing damaged tissue to renew and repair.

Find out more about musculoskeletal problems that shock wave treatment can help treat, whether you have hypersensitive areas in your forearm muscles, lateral epicondylitis, or shin splints:

Tibial Stress Syndrome (Shin Splint) – Shin splints, commonly known as tibial stress syndrome, is a painful sensation in the shins. The condition frequently manifests itself after physical activity. Overworked muscles could be one of the causes. Shin splints are most common in sports that require quick direction changes, although they can also occur in untrained athletes, such as following a weight gain or a change in footwear.

Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Spur) – The heel spur is a bony spur on the heel bone that can appear on the back or bottom of the foot. Plantar Fasciitis, or inflammation of the plantar tendon on the soles, is sometimes connected with the lower heel spur.

Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee) – Patellar tendonitis, or inflammation of the patellar tendon, produces pain near the bottom of the kneecap (patella) – usually on one leg. Patellar Tendonitis, often known as Jumper’s Knee, is a common ailment among runners.

Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Spur) – The heel spur is a bony spur on the heel bone that can appear on the back or bottom of the foot. Plantar Fasciitis, or inflammation of the plantar tendon on the soles, is sometimes connected with the lower heel spur.

Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee) – Patellar tendonitis, or inflammation of the patellar tendon, produces pain near the bottom of the kneecap (patella) – usually on one leg. Patellar Tendonitis, often known as Jumper’s Knee, is a common ailment among runners.

Epicondylitis (Tennis and Golfer’s Elbow) – Epicondylitis is a painful irritant of the forearm muscles’ tendons. A limited sensitivity over the muscle attachment at the elbow is typical, and pain is triggered or increased when these muscles are acted upon. Epicondylitis is referred to as tennis or golfer’s elbow depending on where it occurs.

Calcific Tendonitis (Calcareous Shoulder) – Calcific Tendonitis is characterized by calcareous deposits in tendons and tendon insertions. As a result, this condition is also known as calcareous shoulder. The supraspinatus tendon is most often impacted. Acute inflammatory diseases can occur as a result of decreased blood flow. These inflammatory problems are most noticeable at night or while you are at rest.

Achillodynia (Chronic Achilles Tendon Pain) – Achillodynia is a painful Achilles tendon syndrome that starts in the calf muscles and extends to the heel bone. Achillodynia is a condition that is caused by chronic overuse of the Achilles tendon.

If you want to live a pain-free life, make an appointment with a physiotherapy clinic.

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